test

A small steering wheel


2015 Peugeot 208 Style 1.2 / 82

All I knew about this car was that it was French and had a rather small steering wheel.

Look-and-Feel4
-“What a small car!”  That was the first thought that went through my mind as I picked up the 208, parked next to a bulbous Peugeot 3008. From the inside, the 208 felt quite spacious. Peugeot has managed to create extra room for the driver by pulling the A-pillars far forward and putting in a tiny steering wheel. Even though it is small, it feels solid. The instruments are gathered in one cluster above the steering wheel and a touchscreen is placed exactly where it should be, high up on the middle of the dashboard. The airconditioner controls are located further down on the center console. I would not call the interior elegant, but elements of chrome and soft plastic made a positive impression.

Tinted rear windows from the B-pillars and chromed side mirror housings, alloy wheels, fog lights, manual air conditioning, leather steering wheel, electric front windows and nice seat textures tell me that we are a few steps up on the equipment ladder. I like the paint as well, – “gray shark”.

Driving4
Peugeot claims that a small steering wheel enhances the driving pleasure. It certainly made the car feel “handy” in the city. But on open roads, it did not make any difference whatsoever. We ran across some strong side winds. The 208 is not more sensitive than other cars in its class, but it felt a bit odd to correct for crosswind with such a tiny wheel.

Odd, but not unsafe.

I would say there are a few aspects of this car that could make it a ladies’ car. The first is the small wheel. Second, the pedals. I nearly got my foot stuck between the brake pedal and the accelerator, wearing my Danish Ecco-shoes size 46 (US: 13). The 208 really could have been a feminine, trendy, French car if it wasn’t for the gear lever. It is so big and clumsy that I guess it must have been designed for an 18-wheeler.

Nor did the 1.2-litre petrol engine feel particularly chic. The three cylinders gave an unusually rough sound when it was pushed, and I was forced to push it several times on the busy roads in the South of France. At cruising speed, the engine went ever so smoothly with a nice purr, but every time it was pushed, the harsh sound returned. According to specifications, the engine should deliver 82 HP, and I believe the figures are correct, but the rough sound gave me a feeling of having less power.

With approximately 8000 km on the counter I felt the powertrain a little wobbly when maneuvering through slow traffic and in parking houses. It is also possible to hear the transmission and powertrain quite well, as you do in most French cars. I like French cars, and the 208 is no exception. I might as well describe the noise from the powertrain as “charming”.

Let me also point out that the Peugeot had a very good road holding, as I would expect in any small French car, and indeed in a Peugeot.

Comfort4
It took me just a few seconds to find a comfortable seating position, despite the fact that only the rear part of the seat cushion can be lifted, and the seatbacks cannot be adjusted steplessly. I am 1.88 (6′ 3″). The other driver of 1.62 (5′ 4″) found a comfortable position, too, after just a few seconds. I give a “4” for comfort and the way the suspension handles road bumps – actually a lot better than many cars in the class above. The 208 has a long wheelbase for its class. 253 cm (99.6″) is actually longer than the first generation of the Saab 900.

The comfort is spoiled a little by the unpleasant sound from the engine under pressure, but the sound at cruising speed is fine.

Space3
The long wheelbase provides good length in the interior. Four adults are comfortably seated. With a fifth passenger it gets cramped, but it works alright over short distances. I used the car to transport a kitchen table. In order to get it into the extended boot, I had to push the seat far forward and put my seatback in a very upright position. Even then, I was amazed to find a pretty comfortable seating position.

The trunk is about the size of the Volkswagen Polo. It houses one large suitcase or two small. If you need more space, you have to fold down one of the rear seat backrests.

Safety4
Safety in the 208 is at the same level as the Polo. The NCAP results show that the 208 have a bit better protection for children onboard, but poorer safety for pedestrians. The Peugeot group (PSA) has long remained in the top team with respect to safety.

I don’t know what impact it may have in case of a head-on collision, but the extra space in front of the driver provided by the downsized wheel and the forward A-pillars, gave a good safety feeling.

An important active safety feature that you can order with your 208, is “heads up display” where the most important information is projected onto the windshield. This was not installed on the car I tested.

Economy5
According to the specifications, fuel consumption on mixed driving conditions should be 5.8 liters per 100 km (40 mpg) – on highway 3.9 (60 mpg). I did not manage to follow these figures during the the 14 days we drove the car. I like to drive economically, but I found it real hard to drive the 208 without pushing the engine. An E-HDI (diesel) would probably be a more desireable choice, but I’m not sure it can be justified from an economic point of view. A 92-HP 1.6-liter e-HDI engine puts € 2 550 on the price tag.

From the options list I would definately pick the automatic climate control and the “heads up display” option.

Modern Peugeots are reliable cars that can take high mileages. They are also far less prone to rust than their German competitors.

The PSA group’s most important car?

positive1
• Long wheelbase, good interior length and good road holding
• Easy to find a comfortable driving position

negative1
• The engine sounds harsh and rough when being pushed.
• The powertrain is a little wobbly and could be a little more silent.

peugeot-208-13

This is the landscape where the 208 was tested.

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Just Perfect!


2014 Volkswagen Golf 1.6 / 105 DSG BMT

If you are searching a modern compact car, there are plenty of reasons to consider the new Golf. This is the car that most Europeans have chosen for years and years – and years to come. I have tested the “seventh wonder” – Volkswagen Golf MkVII.

Look-and-Feel5
Put yourself behind the wheel. Everything is where it is supposed to be. Everything, – from the door handles to the seat adjustment handles – to the radio. You find yourself intuitively at home in a nice, firm, but comfy seat. The interior is simple, but stylish. Everything you put your hands on, feels solid and consistent. You get a good grip on the steering wheel. The DSG gear lever asks to be put in “Drive”. I want to give the new Golf a top score for look and feel, but realize that the “6” should be saved for real luxury cars. After all, the Golf is not a luxury car.

Driving5
I wondered if I had picked a two-liter TDI, instead of the 1.6. I had not. A single exhaust pipe tells the world that this definitely is the 1.6 TDI, but it feels stronger. It is said that the DSG robotized automatic transmission shifts better than even the most experienced driver. I like the way it works. It works its way through the 7 gears extactly how I would shift myself. The DSG is actually a dual transmission, where the inboard computer prepares your next gear before you need it. The computer has to decide whether you are going to shift up or down. It made right decisions for me most of the times. There were a few conflicts between me and the technology, – but none that were inexplicable.
Anyway, the powertrain is absolutely fantastic for such a modest engine! And the Golf has a class-leading good handling, everywhere – on the highway, on winding mountain roads. It is remarkably easy to drive. It almost runs by itself.

Comfort5
The first drive took me two hours on the motorway, effortlessly at speeds around 130 km/h (80 mph). The noise level was low. I also had the pleasure to take the Golf on trips over mountain roads and backroads. What I especially like about driving the Golf is that it is firm and responsive, but comfortable at the same time. It’s a perfect match between the two.

Space4
On the outside, the Golf is slightly shorter than its competitors such as the Opel Astra and the Citroen C4, but it does not feel smaller on the inside. Still, this is not a real family car.

Safety5
Passive safety is one of Golf’s best selling points. I also want to emphasize the car’s good active handling as well. On the road, few compact cars in this price segment feel so predictable and safe.

Economy6
The first two hours in 130 km/h (80 mph) gave an average consumption of 4.5 litres per 100 km (52 US mpg). Not bad, although it can easily be matched by other competitors. But few can match the Golf’s resale value. Our test car had the Start & Stop where the engine turns itself off when you stop at traffic lights. This feature does not work well with DSG, the engine starts unexpectedly several times, just by changing the pressure on the brake pedal. I always turn it off.

My conclusion is that the TDI and the DSG is a perfect match.

positive1
• Excellent powertrain with the TDI and the DSG
• Low fuel consumption
• Comfortable noise level
• Safe and comfortable handling

negative1
• The Start & Stop feature does not work well with automatic transmissions