On the gallery

A Tribute to the VW Bus

In fact, all Volkswagen buses are great, especially the early models T1 and T2. Functional, simple and very beautiful. I’d like to emphasize the feeling of having huge space inside, despite the modest external dimensions. The comfort can be a little so-and-so. The seats are strictly functional. You are sitting pretty much upright. The sound level inside is not bad, due to the rear mounted engine. But a rear mounted, air cooled engine does not make the best foundation for heating up the cabin of a mini bus. Keeping the windows defrosted during the cold Nordic winters can be a challenge without the optional Ebersprächer heating system.

I remember the old VW buses from my own childhood. They were popular as commercial vans, family cars for large families and households who wanted a combined company car and passenger car. When they had finished their service, many were driven into the woods or on a ground where they were left to rust and slowly transformed to moss.

Even as rusty wrecks, the T1 and T2 are beautiful cars. Today, old wrecks are dragged out of the Nordic forests to be renovated and repaired on the Continent by people with plenty of time and money and a burning love for VW buses. It might be profitable, too, as vintage VW buses can be traded at ridiculous high prices. They are valued according to the number of windows. The more windows, the higher the price.

Every year, many of the world’s finest VW buses make a visit to VolksWorld at Sandown Park racecourse in Esher, Surrey. I was there last year and took the pictures in the gallery at the top of the page. In 2018 the event will be held 24-25 March. All green areas are transformed into a large camping area where owners of VW buses can stay overnight. Many of the visitors are coming over from the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Germany.

Ratlook, slammed, pristine – all are equally fine. I always take pictures of T1s and T2s, both at exhibitions and along the road. I have only one concern, though. I see a lot more buses than pickups. Where have all the VW pickups gone? I fear that many of them have ended up as donor cars for bus projects.

– Hope to see more VW pickups on VolksWorld 2018!

VolksWorld Show – Sandown Park – 24th & 25th March 2018.

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Air-cooled Beauties

There is something special about air-cooled Volkswagens and Porsches.

I think we all have memories from an air-cooled Volkswagen. Good memories. At least I have. My first ride in a Beetle was in ’64. A green split-window from 1953. I never forget.

Earlier this year, I took some pictures at an exhibition held by local owners of air-cooled Volkswagens and Porsches. The event was held at Oslo Folk Museum, a place where different time capsules are being kept authentic, like the 50’s and the 60’s, – the years when the air-cooled beauties were roaming the streets.

If you click on the picture gallery above, you will see 1959 Porsche 356, 1950 VW split-window Beetle, 1973 Porsche 911, 1973 VW 1303 S Cabrio and a couple of Beetles from the sixties.

Low tuned motorway cruiser

2010 Audi A4 2.0 TDI 120hp

This Audi A4 stands on Nordic winter tyres with 16” alloy wheels. The paint is Lava Gray Metallic.

In 2010 the 2.0 TDI was delivered in 4 variants – 120 hp, 136 hp, 140 hp and 170 hp. All engines shared the same mechanical components, but were electronically tuned to perform differently. The 120 hp is still in Audi’s TDI program as a special down-tuned model for high-tax countries, like Norway and Denmark. Low tuned engines can easily be “chipped” for more Power later.

The down-tuned engine is not a big problem as there is plenty of torque in the engine (290 Nm between 1750-2500 rpm). This car is lowered 2 cm (3/4”) from the factory and has the sport suspension. This, plus Audi’s good handling and aerodynamics makes this A4 a decent motorway-cruiser.

Blue Polo

2010 Volkswagen Polo 1.4 / 86 DSG Comfort 5 door

This Polo Mark V is finished in Shadow Blue metallic paint. The pictures are taken around midsummer in Oslo.

I don’t know if it’s supposed to be secret, but Polo comes in two sizes, – small and big. Although they look exactly the same on the outside, they are quite different underneath. The small Polo has a 3-cylinder engine. It runs on a quite soft suspension, stops with disc brakes on the front wheels and drum brakes (!) on the rear wheels. The big Polo has 4-cylinder engines, runs on a more firm and sporty suspension and has disc brakes all around. It also has wider tires. Believe me, the difference is very noticeable. The small Polo runs like a small car. The big Polo runs like a Golf.

The Polo on the gallery is a “big” Polo. With its 7-speed DSG automatic gear box, it is a pleasure to drive.